Adoptable Dogs

The Pet Sitter of Boise, LLC fosters an  I.H.S. IDAPI (Inmate Dog Alliance Project of Idaho) dog, as needed, from each new graduating class. We believe IDAPI serves the community well by rehabilitating both dogs and inmates and benefits all involved. We are also the Idaho fox terrier rescue representative for a Seattle based rescue.

 

Updated February 11, 2012

 

 

Did you Know?

 

I.H.S. has a 97% adoption rate for dogs?! It’s true!

 

We, at The Pet Sitter, LLC are SOOO proud of the amazing staff and volunteers at I.H.S. and the Petsmart adoption center (mall location). We also appreciate the adopting public. Please support I.H.S. with your time and finances to keep this trend going! 97% means that ALL adoptable dogs are adoption. Dogs with aggression and/or severe health issues represent the 3% that are considered not adoptable.

 

 

 

 

Since Bella was adopted, we are currently without a foster dogs. We expect to get our next IDAPI graduate on July 9, 2011. Stay tuned!

 

 

 

**Adoption Success Stories:**

 

 

 

Jennie was adopted on October 30. She is going to be a Canadian, living in British Columbia! Here she is with her new dad.

Jennie is a 4 year old smooth fox terrier that was an unclaimed stray at The Idaho Humane Society. Jennie does not get along with female small dogs, cats, birds, etc. But, she loves people!

Bella was adopted on June 23, 2011 to a wonderful family with another dog. Here is a photo of her resting on her first day “home”

2 year old terrier mix – Bella in Latin means “beautiful.” She lives up to her name and more….great people lover and full of life. She loves daily walks and playtime in a park or back yard. Since she loves car rides and is crate trained, she’s ready to explore the open road with her new family. After a few pats, she has no problem trying to crawl into your lap and gives you endless smooches. She loves cats and other dogs and appears to be good when introduced to children. Bella is a medium sized dog that only weighs 33-lbs. and has a short, slick, easy-care coat. Bella is an adorable, medium sized dog that would make a good pet for a family or a senior that wants a good walking companion. She is loving, playful, sweet and enjoys working for positive reinforcement. Bella just graduated from the Inmate Dog Alliance Project of Idaho (IDAPI Program) where she lives with and is trained by inmates at one of the Idaho correctional centers. During this two-month period, the dog lives with the inmates in a prison setting and is trained daily in basic obedience, house and crate training. They are frequently taught a number of various tricks such as shake with both paws, spin, turn, roll over, crawl, play dead, retrieve, touch noses, sit up and beg. She also enjoys playing a good game of fetch with a ball. They are also taught to be good indoor companions while at the same time, they get to interact, play and bond with the other dogs in the program. At the end of the training period, these dogs are evaluated to make sure that they have been trained properly and can perform the commands that they have been taught. If you are interested in adopting an IDAPI trained dog, an application and a two-hour workshop to familiarize new potential owner with the dog and the training methods is required. The workshops are held on specific Saturdays and potential owners will be contacted with the date and time to attend. To request an application by e-mail, contact: dfugit@idahohumanesociety.org or call foster parent Julie at 208/484-2969 to find out more information about this adorable dog.

Radar lucked out when a family from Cascade, ID sought him out and adopted him. He is now happily sharing his new digs with a canine brother, two human childen, mom and dad. He loves to run on the three acres he now calls home.

 

 

Radar is a one year old, male, Australian Kelpie mix breed dog that can be shy when he first meets new people but once he warms up and bonds to you, he will be your best friend. He is smart and easily trained using positive reinforcement. Radar needs a home where he can play and interact both with his family and would benefit from a home with another dog for him to play with. Continue socialization is recommended to get him used to environments that he is unfamiliar with. Radar has a short, easy-care coat of fur with beautiful brindle markings. Because Radar is a bit shy and sound sensitive, smaller children are not recommended. His foster mom reports that he is sweet and outgoing. He loves to play with other dogs. Radar just graduated from the Inmate Dog Alliance Project of Idaho (IDAPI Program) where he lived with and was trained by inmates at one of the Idaho correctional centers. During this two-month period Radar lived with the inmates in a prison setting and was trained daily in basic obedience. He was house and crate trained and he learned lots of basic commands such as sit, down, heel, stand, recall, down on recall, stay, leave it and come. He also learned the following tricks: shake and high five with both paws, wave, sit up and beg, play dead, roll over, stand and crawl. The dogs in the IDAPI program are also taught to be good indoor companions while at the same time, they get to interact, play and bond with the other dogs in the program. At the end of the training period, these dogs are evaluated to make sure that they have been trained properly and can perform the commands that they have been taught. To apply for an IDAPI trained dog, you must complete an IDAPI application and, if selected as a potential adopter, a phone interview will be conducted prior to the dog’s graduation. If chosen, you will then be asked to attend a 2-hour workshop where you will meet the dog and also learn the commands that the dog knows and how to work with him/her. If you are interested in meeting Radar, or have questions about him, please contact his foster mom, Julie, at julie.fredrick@gmail.com or 208-484-2969. If you are interested in applying for this dog or any dog in the IDAPI program, please contact Dee at the Idaho Humane Society and request an application. The phone number is 208/331-8552 and the e-mail address is: dfugit@idahohumanesociety.org

 

Spy is moving to Oklahoma where he will share his home with another smooth fox terrier and his fox terrier-loving mom, Pam. We’re excited for Spy and we are now planning his transport.

 

 

 

 

 

Spy (left) with his new sister, Timber

 

 

The luck of the Irish must be with me! I’ve had a succession of awesome foster dogs lately! Spy is no exception!

 

 

Spy is a 15# 1.5 year old neutered smooth fox terrier. Spy is smart, busy, active (but not hyper), quiet, and sweet! He is house trained and crate train. Spy loves other dogs and is a curious terrier. We love Spy! Spy’s adoption fee is $200 through The Puget Sound Fox Terrier Rescue.  If interested in Spy, please contact foster mom Julie at julie.fredrick@gmail.com or call 484-2969.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fabio now calls Montana home! He has over 100 acres to run on and goes to work with his new mom every day. A recent email from Fabio’s mom said that Fabio’s favorite toy is a Chuck-it flying squirrel! She said she can’t get over what a great dog Fabio is….”he’s just so perfect in every way!” We think Fabio says the same thing about his new mom!

 

Fabio is a beautiful purebred German Shepherd dog that was owned by a previous pet sitting client of The Pet Sitter, LLC. He is 2-3 years old and has AKC papers and pedigree. His previous owner paid a large amount for him as a puppy. When he was no longer able to care for Fabio, he called the breeder to see if they would take him back (no refund of course). To his surprise, the “reputable” breeder did not want Fabio! So, he is available for adoption through IDAWG. Fabio is a wonderful, playful dog. He gets along great with all dogs, large and small. He has a big German Shepherd bark that will intimidate any stranger, but he is friendly to all. Fabio’s liniage is of German Kraft working dogs, so he needs a home that is active and will give him a job to do, or at least get him out to run and play daily. Fabio is mellow and well behaved in the house. He is completely house trained and crate trained. His previous owner put a great deal of energy into getting Fabio off to a good start in life.His adoption fee is $200 through IDAWG.  If interested in Fabio, please contact foster mom Julie at julie.fredrick@gmail.com or call 484-2969.

Update: Here is a photo of Fabio with his owner in Montana. She reports that Fabio is doing great!

Kita was adopted by a lovely young couple on January 22, 2011. They report that she is settling in just fine, loving all the TLC she is getting as the only dog!

Chessapeake Bay Retriever/Labrador retriever mix – Female – 6 years old.

Kita was my foster dog four years ago. She was adopted out to a mother and teenage daughter, who, I thought were just perfect for her. Well, to my surprise, after four years, they returned her to the shelter. Why? Because Kita ate a chocolate cake off the kitchen counter! Are you kidding me I asked the shelter officials? Yep, that was the answer. So, Kita is back with me. She is a delightful dog with a lot of personality. She is IDAPI trained (back in 2006) by inmates at the local penetentary. She is intelligent and kind. She loves people of all ages, other dogs, and cats too. She is house trained and easy to love. If interested, please contact Julie Fredrick at julie.fredrick@gmail.comor 208-484-2969.

Shadow was adopted by a wonderful family with a 10 year old daughter. I’m sure Shadow is loving life now!

Border Collie mix – Female – 4 years old. Shadow is very nice dog. She likes to play and be active, but inside she is a cuddle bug with perfect house manners. She weighs 41 pounds and is considered to be a medium size dog. She does not need to be crated while her owners are away. She is house trained, crated trained (if preferred) and knows some commands and tricks. She is great off leash too. Shadow is great with other dogs and people of all ages, but is not good with cats. She is very loyal to her masters and has a quiet disposition. Shadow rides in the car nicely too. Shadow is very intelligent and agile. She needs to be in the house, with the family as her hair is short and she is a dog that loves her people. Her previous owner was handicapped and could not get out to take Shadow for walks and/or hikes. Shadow needs a 6′ fence as she glides over 3-4′ fences as though they are not there! Her ideal home would include no or older children. While she is non-aggressive, she has not been around toddlers and she recently ran and hid from a 2 year old that she did not understand. If interested in learning more about this strikingly beautiful and wonderful dog, please contact her foster mom, Julie at 484-2969 or email her at julie.fredrick@gmail.com

After 4 months as my foster dog, Flash got adopted by a wonderful family on 12/11/10. He will be well-loved!

Greyhound/Border Collie mix – male – 6 years old. “Flash” is about as perfect as they come. He was relinquished due to his family going through some hard times forcing them to give him up. His previous owner wrote that he likes to lay on the back of the coach and look out the window, run and play in the back yard, and cuddle with the family while they watched TV or read. He is a lover and is sensitive. Flash is an easy to train, kind hearted dog who LOVES to go on walks/runs and the highlights of his life are hiking trips with the family and going to the dog park. He plays well with other dogs and is very good with strangers and children of all ages. He has never been the slightest bit aggressive with anyone. Flash is active and needs daily exercise. He is the perfect walking/jogging companion. Flashes only negative is that he likes to chase cats, so he will need to go to a home without them. Flash is house trained and crate trained. He had no health issues and is vaccinated and neutered. He is tall, sleek and agile. He weighs 58#. His coat is shorter in length and is a beautiful brown color and is very soft. If interested in learning more about this beautiful dog, please contact foster mom, Julie Fredrick at julie.fredrick@gmail.com or call 208-484-2969.

Bobbie: After 1-1/2 years, my longest term foster dog was adopted  by a WONDERFUL family who thinks she is the sweetest, smartest dog on the planet (because she is!). Congratulations Bobbie, Scott and Carolyn!

Bobbie is a precious 3 year old black lab. She was used by a breeder to have puppies. We are not sure why they dumped her. It is evident that she has had puppies.  Bobbie has an adorable shy, loving, silly, affectionate, playful personality. She gets along great with other dogs and is showing signs of being a real water lover. Her adoption fee is $150. through IDAWG to cover her spay, vaccination, and microchip. She also came to me with an ear infection that was successfully treated by the vet. If interested, please call Kelley at 208-869-4065 or Julie at 208-484-2969. Thanks!

I received this photo from Bobbie’s new owner…here she is enjoying camping on the Middle Fork of the Boise river. The dog in the water is Gracie…also adopted by this wonderful family!

Piper: Piper was adopted by a twenty-something girl who loves her very much!

Labrador Retriever/pit bull terrier mix – female – 4 years old. Piper graduated on 10-24-09 from the Inmate Dog Alliance Project of Idaho (IDAPI Program) where she was socialized and obedience trained for two months. While there she was housetrained, leash trained and crate trained. She also learned the following commands: sit, stay, come, down, heel, right turn, left turn, down on recall, shake right and left, wave, high five, sit up, play dead and several other fun commands. She loves to play with other dogs, but it is critical that she is properly introduced to new dogs. She enjoys the water and getting a bath. Piper weighs 57-lbs. and has a short, easy to care for coat of fur. Piper came to the shelter as a stray. She was obviously neglected/abused by her previous owner as she has scars all the way around her neck probably caused from being chained up outside. It breaks our hearts to see this and a few other scars and such a sweet dog. Arriving at the shelter was truly a great thing for Piper. Her life has entered a new chapter and she now has a chance at a better life. Piper is extremely sweet and loyal. She is intelligent and eager to please. She has excellent house manners and is calm and relaxed indoors. Piper would do well as an only dog or in a home with another dog her size. She loves people of all ages, but should go to a home with no small children. She is not good with cats so a feline-free home is a must. An approved application and a one time, free, mandatory obedience class is required when adopting a dog from the Inmate Dog Alliance Project of Idaho (IDAPI Program). If you are interested in this dog, an IDAPI applicaiton is required. To obtain one or to find out more about this dog, contact Dee Fugit at 208/331-8552 or e-mail dfugit@idahohumanesociety.org and ask for an application. To meet this nice girl, contact her foster mom Julie at 208/484-2969 or julie.fredrick@gmail.com

Cubby is the kind of dog  you’d see following a little boy around. Well, he got his little boy! A family with a young boy and a teenage girl adopted him. The family and Cubby are doing great!

Cubby is a proud new graduate of the Inmate Dog Alliance Project of Idaho (IDAPI) program where he learned basic obedience commands plus a few tricks! Cubby is described as a smart boy who loves people and other dogs. He is still very much a puppy and needs exercise and play, but he is maturing into a wonderful dog. He has a cute personality and will keep his new owners smiling. He loves toys, especially a bright green rubber bone he found in his foster mom’s backyard. He loves to carry it around. Cubby would be an awesome hiking partner who would be trustworthy with other dogs encountered in the foothills. He is completely non-aggressive. He recently let a child take a rawhide bone out of his mouth with no complaints or possessive tendencies. Cubby is someone of a non-alpha dog, but he is confident playing with other dogs. He is completely house trained and crate trained and rarely barks. His foster mom describes him as confident and balanced with no baggage from his past. Please contact foster mom Julie for more information 484-2969 or julie.fredrick@gmail.com or to arrange an introduction to Cubby.

Update: Here is a photo of Cubby with his family camping in Idaho…The family reports that Cubby loves the water and is an amazing member of their family…awww!

Tana: Adoption Success! Tana went home with an active retired couple. She is definitely moving onto a better life full of love!
Tana is our newest IDAPI foster dog. IDAPI stands for Inmate Dog Alliance Program of Idaho. Tana spent 8 weeks in the prison, matched with an inmate trainer. She spent 24/7 with her inmate trainer, so she received some very focused training. She delights in showing off her basic commands and some tricks too. We picked her up after she graduated on November 7, 2009. What a delightful little dog! When I first saw her, I thought, “Oh, what a cute yellow lab puppy!” But, in fact, she is just over a year old. She weighs 40# and is a nice size for most situations. This girl is full of playful personality. She loves to play with other dogs and also likes to play “catch me if you can.”  I like calling her “C’Mon-tana!” Her inmate trainer was really touched by her saying she had stolen his heart with her gentle, magical nature. Tana is still very much a puppy at heart and needs a little reinforcement on some of her training, but she is sure to make a nice family dog or hiking/camping companion for a single person or family. If interested, contact me soon as she will be snapped up quickly.

Murphy This cutie pie is a 2 year old wire hair fox terrier that ended up in the Canyon County shelter. Fox terrier rescue got him and adopted him out to a wonderful fox terrier -loving couple in Springfield, OR. Problem…how to get him from Boise to Springfield? Solution: Pilots and paws ( www.pilotsnpaws.org ) to the rescue! A volunteer pilot just happened to be flying into Caldwell, so he offered to take little Murphy back home with him! All went well and Murphy is having a blast being spoiled by his new people! Thanks Paws N Pilots and pilots Steve and Suzanne!

Brady: ADOPTED! The heartwarming story here is that this is the second IDAPI dog this person has adopted. Sadly, her first dog, Libby, died of brain cancer a few months ago. While the adopter swore she was done with dogs because of the heartbreak when they die, Brady stole her heart. Brady is one lucky dog!!

Labrador Retriever Mix – Male – 1 year old- 50-lbs. Brady is a new graduate of the Inmate Dog Alliance Project of Idaho (the IDAPI program) where for the past two months he has been in training at the Idaho Correctional facility with two inmate trainers. During this two month period, the dogs live in the facility with the inmates and are trained every day for the entire two month period. Brady excelled in learning his basic obedience commands as well as some tricks. Brady is also house and crate trained. He is now in a foster home where his foster mom reports that he loves to play and gets along great with the other dogs. He has a cute personality and is developing into a wonderful young dog. He settles down nicely after play time. We believe he’ll make a loyal and gentle companion for an active family with or without kids or a single person. If you are interested in learning more about Brady, or arranging a meeting, please contact his foster mom, Julie at julie.fredrick@gmail.com or 208-484-2969. For more information about the IDAPI program, please contact Dee Fugit at 208/331-8552 or e-mail dfugit@idahohumanesociety.org  The adoption fee for IDAPI dogs is $150.00 which includes spaying/neutering, vaccinations, microchipping and two months of training and the free obedience class.

Adoption Success! Peaches, a 1 year old yellow lab rescued from the Idaho Falls shelter, was sponsored by the Golden Gate Lab Rescue in SanFrancisco, CA. Kelley Moore got her out of the shelter and I fostered her until we could get her to SF. It was all worth it…Peaches’ forever family was waiting for her and she went home to them on August 23. This is a photo of Peaches with one of her ‘kids’. What a happy ending for this great dog!!

Adoption Success! Barney, a 5 year old Wire Fox Terrier, was brought into IHS because he was always under foot and causing his elderly owner to fall. After a very short time in foster care at my house, he was adopted by a retired couple in Seattle. They report that he fit right in and has given himself the job of property patrol dog as he is constantly surveying the boundaries of the yard and also keeping the squirrels in line! They love him and say it is a match made in heaven! Yeah Barney!

Elvis was adopted by a family in Eagle, ID. He now shares a home with the family, goats, chickens, and two other dogs. Way to go Elvis!

German Shepherd/Kelpie mix – male – 1 year old – “Elvis” is a proud graduate of the Inmate Dog Alliance Project of Idaho(IDAPI Program). IDAPI dogs are popular because they are trained basic obedience and are well socialized with dogs and people while at the prison. Elvis is a well balanced dog. He loves to play and is non-aggressive. He settles down nicely after play.He is extremely smart and loves to show off the commands he learned while at the prison. He is a medium energy dog that seems to have no hang-ups at all. He loves to play with toys too. We think he’d make a great family dog and would do especially well in a home with another dog. He likes people of all ages and was in a home with a child with no problems at all. Unfortunatley, the family gave him up because of a family member’s persistant allergies to Elvis. If you are interested in meeting this super dog, please contact foster mom Julie at julie.fredrick@gmail.com or 208-484-2969. If you have additional questions about the IDAPI program or want to get your application in early for the next graduating class, please contact Dee at the Idaho Humane Society, 208/331-8552 or e-mail dfugit@idahohumanesociety.organd ask for an IDAPI application. The adoption fee for Elvis is $100 which includes training, neutering, vaccinations and microchipping.

 

Baby was adopted to a wonderful senior citizen who reports that she is the perfect match for him! Yeah!

Australian Kelpie mix – female – 3 years old. “Baby” has a sweet personality and will be a wonderful companion. She is a bit shy at first and is happy to attach herself to one person. She is very quiet and rarely barks. Baby likes to play with soft toys and hide her treasures. She’s learning to fetch and bring her toys to you when she wants to play. She approaches activities with enthusiasm, but she is well-mannered and not a hyper dog. Baby is a perfect medium-sized dog. She is house trained, crate trained, and knows basic commands such as sit, down, shake, back, enough, and come. She is great walking on the leash, and she loves to run at the park. If you show confidence when approaching other dogs, she will greet them happily. Baby does not enjoy being outside for extended periods alone, and she is easily startled by loud noises and sudden movements. She will be a welcomed addition to a quiet home where she can be your companion. For more information or to meet Baby, contact foster mom Julie at julie.fredrick@gmail.com or 208-484-2969. Adoption fee is $75

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Cricket was adopted on 2/24/09. Congrats to Cricket and her new family!

Cricket is a cute little 3 year old Wire Hair Fox Terrier. She is a petite 14 pounds. She is actually pretty mellow and loves to sit on laps. She is active outside, but not hyper. The above photo was taken right after she was relinquished at the shelter…please excuse the dirty mess she is in. She has since has a bath and I will post new photos shortly. Cricket’s housetraining had lapsed due to negligent owners. I’ve now reinforced that and she is great at going outside to do her business now, but it will take some additional reinforcement to maintain the “housebroken” status! Cricket would do best in a home with adults and/or older children as younger ones may accidently leave the door open and she may possibly be a bolter as this is common for this breed. Cricket is crate trained and quiet. I have not heard her bark yet! Her adoption fee is $200 and she comes with papers and pedigree (turned in with her). She is spayed, vaccinated, and microchipped. Call me at 484-2969 for more info or julie.fredrick@gmail.com

Adoption Success! Taffy was adopted on 2-15-09

 

Labrador retriever mix – female – 3 years old. “Taffy” is a proud new graduate of the Inmate Dog Alliance Project of Idaho program (IDAPI Program). She was trained in basic obedience (sit, down, heel, stay, stand, come, etc.) also learned a few extra tricks. Taffy is a wonderful dog who gets along with people of all ages and other dogs. She has a playful personality, but is not hyper. She loves to play with sticks, balls and ropes, but then settles down nicely while in the house. She does not jump up on people. Taffy is house trained, crate trained and rides nicely in the car. She is an all around great dog who is very easy to get along with. Her only negative is that she loves to chase cats, so she’ll need to go to a home without cats. Taffy weighs 52 pounds and is spayed, vaccinated, and microchipped. Her adoption fee is $150. If interested in learning more about Taffy or arranging to meet her, please call or email foster mom, Julie at julie.fredrick@gmail.com or 208-484-2969. To obtain more information about the IDAPI program and other dogs graduating soon, please contact Dee Fugit at 342-3508 ext. #2227 or dfugit@idahohumanesociety.org 

 

Adoption Success! Lucky was adopted on 12-31-08. His new family is now trying to socialize him with their cats. Fun times!

 

Australian Shepherd/Terrier mix- male – 1.5 years old. Lucky is a happy boy with that special something that makes him very charming. He is great with older kids (tends to herd smaller ones though). He is a quiet dog with a cute, terrier personality. He loves to follow his master around the house and always has a wagging tail and positive atttitude. He is house broken and crate trained and has good manners. His wirey coat and baby blue eyes make him a uniquely attractive boy. He weighs 50 pounds. He is great on a leash and is easy to handle. While he gets along fine with other dogs, he would be just as happy being an only dog too. He is attentive and responsive and learns easily. He will make a loyal companion. If you are interested in obtaining more information or meeting this nice boy, please contact his foster mom, Julie at julie.fredrick@gmail.com or 208-484-2969.

 

Adoption Success!: Keezie was adopted on 11-24-08! Keezie is a great dog who got matched up with a FANTASTIC family!!! We are excited about the lifetime of joy that lies ahead for this family and their newest member, “Keezie Legs”! Congratulations!

 

 

 

Adopting a Dog

 

 

There are lots of ways that people choose a new family dog.  Some may search the newspaper for advertisements from breeders who are selling new puppies; others find breeders via listings on the internet, while still more may simply purchase a puppy from a local pet store.  Perhaps the best method, however, in terms of being helpful to society in general is to adopt a dog from a local animal shelter.

 

Adopting a dog brings a new friend into your life.  It also helps to reduce the number of unwanted and homeless dogs in your area.  Unless the shelter is a “no kill” facility (and these are sadly few and far between), it will also save a dog’s life.  Animal lovers everywhere champion the adoption of dogs from shelters as opposed to any other method of bringing home a new pet for this reason alone, but there are other reasons to choose the adoption option.

 

  • ·         Adopted pets have had their shots
  • ·         Shelters often have information about a dog’s temperament
  • ·         Adopting a pet frees space in the shelter for more dogs

 

When you adopt a dog you can be sure that the staff at the shelter has had the dog examined by a vet for diseases and parasites and that the dog has had its shots.  This is not always true of dogs acquired by other means such as kids giving away “free puppies” from a box in front of the local grocery store or PetsMart.

 

The dogs at a shelter are not just strays and often are turned in to the shelter by former owners for various reasons.  When this happens, the shelter collects as much information about the dog as possible, including whether its good with children, how much it barks, how playful or obedient it is, whether its housebroken, and other important details.  While it’s true that this information is only as good as the honesty of the former owner, most of the time it is fairly accurate.

 

Animal shelters provide a valuable service to the community that they serve by keeping the streets as free of stray animals as possible.  Because many of them do this with little or no public funding or governmental support, they are very limited in the number of dogs they can have in the shelter at any given time.  The only way that they can bring in more stray animals is if they remove the ones they currently have.  This is done through adoption or euthanasia. Obviously they would prefer to have the dogs adopted rather than killed.  Adopting a dog could very well save its life and allows the shelter to bring in another dog in its place.   

 

Rescue dogs

 

 

 

 

We have all grown up with at least one hero in our life, but how many people can call their hero Duke or Kiva?  The answer- anyone who has had their life saved by a rescue dog.

 

 

 

Whether it is a house fire, tornado rubble, leftovers from an earthquake, or flowing water behind a hurricane front, these specially trained rescue dogs rush in with no concerns for their own welfare, pulling out victims, some dead and some still alive.  They do this time and time again.

 

 

 

With a powerful snout and the ability to smell things a human may not, rescue dogs are hard-working and very loyal to doing what is expected of them.  And what do they ask for in return?  A hug, a treat or a little one-on-one play time.  Not a huge reward, however for these special dogs, it is very satisfying.

 

 

 

There are different types of breeds who make better rescue dogs than others.  For example, bloodhounds have a talent for prowess and are known for uncovering criminals.  Newfound lands are good avalanche rescue dogs and Labrador Retrievers are good cadaver dogs.  Any dog can become a rescue dog as long as they can concentrate on tracking scent, such as German Shepherds, Belgian Malinois, and Golden Retrievers.

 

 

 

Before being allowed to track, each rescue dog is put through extensive evaluations.  Scent detection training is then started and their skills are developed through regular sessions.  In order to track, the dog will pick up on the odor of the person’s skin cells that flake off the body.  These skin cells float in the air and hit the ground as a person moves along, and they float to the surface of the water if the victim has drowned.

 

 

 

The men and women behind these furry heroes are all volunteers who are fit, enjoy spending time outdoors, and take pride in training and communicating with their rescue dogs.  These men and women may also belong to rescue teams such as SOSARD or SWOSAR, who are called out by the police department and may travel several hours to reach a search site.  Along with their rescue dog they search in all different types of weather and terrain for lost children, missing fishermen and hunters, accident victims and injured hikers.

 

 

 

There is yet another type of rescue dog, who can sniff his trail from the air.  Air-scenting rescue dogs work directly and specifically from aircraft, tracking the air and searching for victims.  These dogs specialize in structural collapses and drowning victims.  Because these air-scenting rescue dogs work on scent trailing above the ground and away from handlers, they become very useful in areas that have been contaminated by human searchers, after it is allowed to be aired out for awhile.

 

 

 

In many survivors’ eyes, these furry canines, which make wonderful family pets, make the best heroes of all!

 

 

Rescue dogs

 

 

 

We have all grown up with at least one hero in our life, but how many people can call their hero Duke or Kiva?  The answer- anyone who has had their life saved by a rescue dog.

 

 

 

Whether it is a house fire, tornado rubble, leftovers from an earthquake, or flowing water behind a hurricane front, these specially trained rescue dogs rush in with no concerns for their own welfare, pulling out victims, some dead and some still alive.  They do this time and time again.

 

 

 

With a powerful snout and the ability to smell things a human may not, rescue dogs are hard-working and very loyal to doing what is expected of them.  And what do they ask for in return?  A hug, a treat or a little one-on-one play time.  Not a huge reward, however for these special dogs, it is very satisfying.

 

 

 

There are different types of breeds who make better rescue dogs than others.  For example, bloodhounds have a talent for prowess and are known for uncovering criminals.  Newfound lands are good avalanche rescue dogs and Labrador Retrievers are good cadaver dogs.  Any dog can become a rescue dog as long as they can concentrate on tracking scent, such as German Shepherds, Belgian Malinois, and Golden Retrievers.

 

 

 

Before being allowed to track, each rescue dog is put through extensive evaluations.  Scent detection training is then started and their skills are developed through regular sessions.  In order to track, the dog will pick up on the odor of the person’s skin cells that flake off the body.  These skin cells float in the air and hit the ground as a person moves along, and they float to the surface of the water if the victim has drowned.

 

 

 

The men and women behind these furry heroes are all volunteers who are fit, enjoy spending time outdoors, and take pride in training and communicating with their rescue dogs.  These men and women may also belong to rescue teams such as SOSARD or SWOSAR, who are called out by the police department and may travel several hours to reach a search site.  Along with their rescue dog they search in all different types of weather and terrain for lost children, missing fishermen and hunters, accident victims and injured hikers.

 

 

 

There is yet another type of rescue dog, who can sniff his trail from the air.  Air-scenting rescue dogs work directly and specifically from aircraft, tracking the air and searching for victims.  These dogs specialize in structural collapses and drowning victims.  Because these air-scenting rescue dogs work on scent trailing above the ground and away from handlers, they become very useful in areas that have been contaminated by human searchers, after it is allowed to be aired out for awhile.

 

 

 

In many survivors’ eyes, these furry canines, which make wonderful family pets, make the best heroes of all!

 

Dog Training Classes Now Offered at the Idaho Humane Society

January marks the kick off of the Idaho Humane Society’s dog training classes! The classes are created to be affordable, offer flexible scheduling and be fun for dogs and their owners.

The IHS dog training classes are designed to fit into your busy schedule and are set up somewhat like a gym membership. You purchase a training pass in 4, 6, 8 or 10 week increments. Owners and dogs can attend class any day Monday through Thursday, up to two times per week for the length of their training pass. With the IHS dog training classes there’s no such thing as missing a class and needing to “make up” a missed lesson, you set your own schedule.

This is in contrast to many traditional dog obedience classes which only meet one day a week, for a set number of weeks, always on the same day each week.

Idaho Humane Society training classes are also very affordable; starting with a 4 week training pass that allows you to attend up to 8 classes for only $60. There are orientation classes for new participants held every week!

For puppies, we offer a Puppy Head Start class and for older dogs we offer 3 fundamental training course topics, each with a specific area of focus. These classes are Good Manners, Coming and Going, and Paying Attention.

Many adult dogs, including those adopted for the shelter, have learned some basic obedience skills already. The flexibility of the IHS training courses allow you to choose to attend only the classes that work on the skills your dog needs to learn or improve upon; perhaps coming when called or walking politely on a leash.

Idaho Humane Society dog training classes are taught by experienced dog trainer Robyn Walters. Walters is a member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers and continually updates her education and researches better ways of training dogs to improve the techniques she teaches dog owners.

For more information about Idaho Humane Society Dog Training classes or to get you and your dog signed up today, visiting our website at www.idahohumanesociety.org or call (208) 342-3508 ext. 2235.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have More Questions? Ready To Reserve? Contact Us Today!

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